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Illinois Medical Marijuana Law

Marijuana Card IL

How to Get a Marijuana Card in Illinois:
Become a Medical Marijuana Patient in Illinois.


Step 1: Must be 18 years of age or older and a resident of Illinois.

Step 2: Must have at least one medical marijuana qualifying condition listed below:

  • cancer
  • glaucoma
  • human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)
  • hepatitis C
  • severe fibromyalgia
  • spinal cord disease, including but not limited to arachnoiditis, Tarlov cysts, hydromyelia, syringomyelia, Rheumatoid arthritis, fibrous dysplasia, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury and post-concussion syndrome
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • muscular dystrophy
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation and Syringomyelia
  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA)
  • Parkinson’s
  • Tourette’s
  • Myoclonus
  • Dystonia
  • Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, RSD (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type I)
  • Myasthenia Gravis
  • Hydrocephalus
  • nail-patella syndrome
  • residual limb pain
  • Causalgia, CRPS (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type II)
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Lupus
  • Interstitial Cystitis
  • or other conditions as determined in writing by a doctor. (Contact a medical marijuana doctor to learn more.)

Step 3: Contact an Illinois medical marijuana doctor. If the doctor diagnoses you with a qualifying medical condition you can get you an Illinois medical marijuana card.

Illinois Medical Marijuana Card Fees

  • Annual qualifying patient application fee is $100
  • Annual qualifying patient reduced application fee is $50
  • - For qualifying patients enrolled in the federal Social Security Disability Income (SSDI) or the Supplement Security Income (SSI) disability programs, submit a copy of a letter or other documentation form the Social Security Administration identifying the qualifying patient and showing the amount of monthly Social Security and Supplemental Security Income disability benefits to be received by the qualifying patient during the current year of application.
    Veterans must provide a copy of their DD214.

  • Annual caregiver application fee is $25
  • Replacement card fee is $25

When you receive your medical marijuana card you can begin your search for medical marijuana in Illinois.

Find Medical Marijuana in Illinois

Illinois Dispensaries
Marijuana Delivery Services
Marijuana Classified Ads

 

IL Marijuana Doctors

Illinois revealed the draft rules for its medical marijuana program this week which outline how the program will operate over the next four years.

The rules show that patients will have to have a qualifying condition diagnosed by a marijuana doctor, then undergo fingerprinting, a background check, and pay $150 a year for a medical marijuana card. Fingerprinting costs $30 to $60. Patients receiving Social Security disability income may have a lower fee of only $75 a year.

Caregivers for qualified medical marijuana patients will pay $125 a year for a card. Caregivers with cards can obtain marijuana from a licensed dispensary on behalf of their patient.

Based off of first-year experience in other medical marijuana states, officials decided to have patients apply in two waves (based on the first initial of their last names), to help manage the expected surge of applicants. The first applications will be on paper, future applications will be accepted online.

In 2014, patients whose last names begin with the letters A through L can submit an application during September or October; whereas, patients whose last names begin with M through Z can submit an application during November or December.

The rules for cultivation centers are still being drafted.

The official rules will be released later this year.

Read the Illinois Medical Marijuana Draft Rules here.

IL Marijuana Law

The Illinois Medical Marijuana Act is one of the strictest in the nation. There are a few Illinois marijuana laws that everyone should know, especially patients and employers. Here are a few noteworthy provisions:

  • A person may not be prescribed more than 2.5 ounces of marijuana during a 14-day period and may not possess more than 2.5 ounces of marijuana at any time;
  • The prescribing physician must have a prior and ongoing medical relationship with the patient and must find that the patient has one of approximately 35 listed debilitating medical conditions for the marijuana to be prescribed;
  • Patients must buy the marijuana from one of 60 dispensing centers throughout the state and may not legally grow their own;
  • Users will carry cards that indicate how much they have bought to prevent stockpiling. The Illinois Department of Public Health will issue the cards;
  • Dispensing centers will be under 24-hour camera surveillance, and workers at dispensing and cultivation centers will undergo criminal background checks;
  • Marijuana use will be banned in public, in vehicles and near school grounds;
  • Property owners will have the opportunity to ban marijuana on their grounds.

The Illinois Medical Marijuana Act also contains certain employment-related provisions in contrast to the recently enacted concealed carry law in Illinois (which provides no guidance to employers).

Under the Illinois Medical Marijuana Act, employers are prohibited from discriminating against or penalizing a person based solely on his/her status as a patient qualified and registered to receive medical marijuana in Illinois. Therefore, employers should not discipline or terminate employees solely because of their use of medical marijuana or their status as a registered user. Furthermore, Illinois employers should not refuse to hire an applicant because he/she is a medical marijuana patient. Doing so could not only violate the Act, but could also violate disability discrimination statutes (assuming the fact that most medical marijuana patients will likely have a disability).

Illinois Medical Marijuana Qualifying Conditions

Illinois Medical Marijuana Dispensaries

Illinois Medical Marijuana Qualifications
Illinois Medical Marijuana Qualifying Conditions.

Qualifying medical conditions for medical marijuana (as listed in Illinois House Bill 1):

  • cancer
  • glaucoma
  • human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
  • acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)
  • hepatitis C
  • severe fibromyalgia
  • spinal cord disease, including but not limited to arachnoiditis, Tarlov cysts, hydromyelia, syringomyelia, Rheumatoid arthritis, fibrous dysplasia, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury and post-concussion syndrome
  • Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
  • amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
  • Crohn’s disease
  • Alzheimer’s disease
  • cachexia/wasting syndrome
  • muscular dystrophy
  • Arnold-Chiari malformation and Syringomyelia
  • Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA)
  • Parkinson’s
  • Tourette’s
  • Myoclonus
  • Dystonia
  • Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, RSD (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type I)
  • Myasthenia Gravis
  • Hydrocephalus
  • nail-patella syndrome
  • residual limb pain
  • Causalgia, CRPS (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type II)
  • Neurofibromatosis
  • Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
  • Sjogren’s syndrome
  • Lupus
  • Interstitial Cystitis

There is no general category for chronic pain in Illinois’s medical marijuana law.

Find an Illinois marijuana doctor if you have any of the above medical conditions.

 

 

Chicago Marijuana Dispensaries

The Illinois medical marijuana law will allow for a considerable amount of medical conditions to qualify for medical marijuana, but only a few handfuls of dispensaries will be operating throughout the state. Below are a few facts about the medical marijuana industry.

1. There will be no more than 60 licensed dispensaries throughout Illinois.

2. There will be 22 cultivation sites, one in each state police district.

3. Although there are already many qualifying medical conditions for medical marijuana, the Department of Public Health may add new qualifying conditions as it sees fit. (Full list of qualifying conditions below.)

4. Patients can purchase up to 2.5 ounces of medical marijuana every two weeks.

5. Patients will be taxed at 1 percent when purchasing medical marijuana.

6. Illinois’ medical marijuana bill goes into effect January 1, but it could take several months for state officials to allow dispensaries to open.

7. Cultivators and dispensaries will be taxed at 7 percent.

Qualifying medical conditions for medical marijuana (as listed in Illinois House Bill 1):

cancer
glaucoma
human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)
acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)
hepatitis C
severe fibromyalgia
spinal cord disease, including but not limited to arachnoiditis, Tarlov cysts, hydromyelia, syringomyelia, Rheumatoid arthritis, fibrous dysplasia, spinal cord injury, traumatic brain injury and post-concussion syndrome
Multiple Sclerosis (MS)
amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)
Crohn’s disease
Alzheimer’s disease
cachexia/wasting syndrome
muscular dystrophy
Arnold-Chiari malformation and Syringomyelia
Spinocerebellar Ataxia (SCA)
Parkinson’s
Tourette’s
Myoclonus
Dystonia
Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy, RSD (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type I)
Myasthenia Gravis
Hydrocephalus
nail-patella syndrome
residual limb pain
Causalgia, CRPS (Complex Regional Pain Syndromes Type II)
Neurofibromatosis
Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy
Sjogren’s syndrome
Lupus
Interstitial Cystitis

Illinois Law

Marijuana Business

llinois’ marijuana penalties (720 ILCS § 550) are rather harsh. Penalties range from 30 days in jail and/or a fine of up to $1,500 for possession of less than 2.5 grams of marijuana or anywhere from one to three years in a state penitentiary and fines of up to $25,000 for possession of more than 30 grams of marijuana.

Recently, many cities allow police officers the option to cite marijuana offenders and punish possession of small amounts with only a small fine. Chicago became one of those cities when Mayor Emmanuel approved an ordinance allowing police officers to cite those in possession of 15 grams or less of marijuana. Marijuana violators in the Chicago face fines of $200-500.

Learn more about  Illinois marijuana law: click here